Update on EP Mobile and Apple #2

As some of you are aware, the Apple App Store rejected an update to the EP Mobile app based on the presence of drug dose calculators in the app. The App Store guidelines state: 22.9 – Apps that calculate medicinal dosages must be submitted by the manufacturer of those medications or recognized institutions such as… Continue reading Update on EP Mobile and Apple #2

Update on EP Mobile and Apple

This is an update on my previous post which dealt with Apple’s rejection of an update to the EP Mobile app because it contained drug dose calculators. According to a clause buried in the App Store Review Guidelines (section 22.9, to be precise), 22.9 apps that calculate medicinal dosages must be submitted by the manufacturer of… Continue reading Update on EP Mobile and Apple

Who Can Write a Drug Dosage Calculator?

Several years ago I had an idea for a smartphone app that could be used to calculate doses for drugs that are prescribed frequently to patients with heart rhythm problems. These drugs include antiarrhythmics such as dofetilide and sotalol, and the new oral anticoagulants such as dabigatran and rivaroxaban. These drugs are handled by the… Continue reading Who Can Write a Drug Dosage Calculator?

How Much Money Do Academic Experts Get From Drug and Device Companies?

Now that Open Payments data is available to the public I decided to do some snooping around.  It’s not hard to do.  I was curious as to how much drug and device company money academic experts receive.  As a cardiologist specializing in electrophysiology I have been to many national meetings, and it is always the same… Continue reading How Much Money Do Academic Experts Get From Drug and Device Companies?

What Motivates Doctors?

As a recently retired physician, I still maintain an interest in medical research, though I have to ask myself: Why? Surely not just from the point of view of a potential future patient. But not from the point of view of a practicing physician either. Perhaps I keep up just from a lifetime of habit?… Continue reading What Motivates Doctors?

Let the Sunshine In

Yesterday I received an email from Medtronic. It was an early release version of the Sunshine Act data that they had sent to the government. The Sunshine Act, passed in 2010 but implemented in 2013, demands the collection and publication of data on payments to physicians in the form of food, travel, or other goods.… Continue reading Let the Sunshine In

The Rent is Too Damn High. Why Does Medical Software Cost So Much?

In an era when Apple gives away its Mavericks OS X operating system for free, when completely free open-source operating systems like Linux and BSD are available, when even Microsoft is considering giving away its Windows operating system for free, one has to ask the question, why is medical software, in particular EHR (Electronic Health… Continue reading The Rent is Too Damn High. Why Does Medical Software Cost So Much?

Making a MOCkery of Medicine

I thought I’d weigh in on the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) recertification process after reading an excellent article on it today. After all, I’ve been through the process several times, most recently enduring it in 2012. I was lucky enough to be “grandfathered” with regard to my Internal Medicine and Cardiology board certifications.… Continue reading Making a MOCkery of Medicine

Fair Use Justification of CPT® Codes in EP Coding

The following is a formal justification for use of a limited number of CPT® codes under the US Copyright law fair use exemption in the soon-to-be-released mobile app EP Coding.   Introduction As CPT® codes are copyrighted by the American Medical Association, it is important to make the case that use of a very small… Continue reading Fair Use Justification of CPT® Codes in EP Coding