Categories
Religion

Are We There Yet?

     During the New Year’s Eve celebrations last night, I briefly thought about our New Year’s Eve bash of 1999/2000.  At the time, there was a great deal of concern expressed from many people about computers all over the world suddenly defaulting.  At the same time, many religious groups (possibly the same who feared computer mutiny) passionately awaited the end of times – certain that this was surely the time when they would all be called up to heaven.   

     As for me, my husband and our children; we spent the millennial New Year’s Eve traveling to the Bahamas. Happily, we were free from any fears that the airplane would mysteriously fall from the sky or that we would be “left behind” as the more righteous Christians abandoned us to a fiery crash while they were being raptured. As atheists, we were clearly in the minority. The plane was nearly empty (more stretch-out room), and our resort hotel vacation was priced well below what is usually seen. We’ll never forget the marvelous vacation time we had.

     OK, so I may never know God and I never really did comprehend the meaning/value of the whole faith issue. However, I surely can recognize mass craziness, and know when I see a great travel deal! Anybody know if there are any more Biblical disasters coming up? Let me know so I can arrange my vacation schedule.

-Gretchen

Categories
Religion

Seasons Greetings

  santa_large.jpg

Categories
Books Religion

"Mere Christianity" by C.S. Lewis

I just finished reading “Mere Christianity” by C.S. Lewis. While initially reading it, I felt quite disappointed in Lewis’ tortured logic, twisted metaphors, and simplistic deductions. There is really a spectacular dearth of reason. He dismisses virtually all but Christian belief (except non-Christian belief systems which share similarities with Christianity), and makes sweeping generalizations supported by non-sequitur examples of everyday life occurrences. He attempts to equate religious beliefs (via his “Law of Human Nature” doctrine) to testable scientific laws, but provides no basis for this assumption and finally succumbs to the “it must be so” argument. He states many “facts” without any apparent vetting.

I have to admit, though, that on finishing the book, I believe I was able to feel some of Lewis’ profound joy about his beliefs. He communicated this well in his last chapters. Not a believer myself, I think that Mr. Lewis was a sincere and moral individual who recognized some of the pitfalls of supernatural thinking (tribalism, superiority, suppression of others) and warned against them. His happiness in what he believes to be the supernatural cohesiveness and his understanding of the universe is palpable.

Overall, I enjoyed reading this book for its poetic, but not intellectual value. I was also impressed that Mr. Lewis did not negate scientific inquiry even once in this book. On the contrary, he did not abandon his scholarly roots and even attempted (though failed) to show logic in a quasi-scientific fashion. He supported the fact of Darwinian evolution over “thousands of centuries”, so at least he wasn’t a new-earther. He even paid Darwin a splendid compliment by breathlessly hoping that a Christ-filled human could be our species’ next evolutionary step.

-Gretchen