Tag Archives: Privacy

Is Apple Really Serious About Protecting Privacy?

I had thought the answer to the question of the title was “yes,” given Tim Cook’s stance on strong encryption. But if a recent experience at my local Apple Store is any guide, the theoretical views of the Apple CEO on privacy have not trickled down to daily practice at the Apple Stores.

My wife’s Macbook Air developed an intermittent display glitch, so we brought it in to the Apple Store. On the initial visit the Genius Bar guy opened up the computer and reseated a video cable. This appeared to work for about a week and then the problem returned. So we brought it back.

At this point the person behind the bar recommended sending the machine off to a repair facility, with an expected 5 day turn-around time and a fairly reasonable price to fix it. This seemed like a good deal, since we were planning to travel in a couple weeks and my wife wanted her computer back before then. So the Genius Bar woman took the computer into the back room and told us to wait until she came back with some paperwork to sign.

After about 10 minutes she came back and said everything was ready. She passed her iPad over to us. The form she wanted us to fill out asked for the user name and password needed to log in to the computer.

I immediately felt uncomfortable. Reading the fine print on the form, it stated that supplying the user log in information was mandatory. We asked if that was so and it was confirmed. It seemed our only alternative was not to get the computer fixed. So, although worried that I was making a big mistake, I wrote in the password, which appeared in the textbox in plain text.

After walking out of the store I felt like I had just participated in a hacker’s social experiment demonstrating how easy it is to get someone to give their password to a complete stranger. My wife uses LastPass, but I know with some websites she has had the browser remember and automatically fill in passwords. Like most of us, she often reuses passwords and doesn’t use two-factor authentification. But even if all her other passwords were secure, there is still a lot of private information on her computer that we wouldn’t want anyone seeing.

So after we got home she and I spent a few hours changing passwords on our bank accounts and other important sites. It made us feel a little better, but not much.

The emailed receipt from Apple clearly stated that they were not responsible for any data loss or data breach from the computer repair. Great! Everything on the computer is backed up, so I wouldn’t care if they wiped the hard drive. I just don’t want anyone snooping around our data.

I don’t think Apple needed to do this. If they really needed access to the user account to fix the computer (which I doubt since they could tell if the screen was working just by turning the computer on without logging in), it would have taken just a few minutes in the store to activate the Guest User account or create a new user account specifically for them to use. Unfortunately I didn’t think of that until after the fact. But maybe this advice could help someone else in a similar situation.

Perhaps I am being paranoid.  I know people who work at a large computer repair facility. There are very strict rules to discourage copying of data from users’ computers. Or perhaps I’m just being naïve.  Much of my private data now lives in “the cloud,” A.K.A. a bunch of computers in unknown locations belonging to unknown people with unknown trustworthiness. So I know that digital security is a bit of a pipe-dream. Despite what we do to secure our data, the forces that want to steal it (crooks, governments, and businesses — in other words, crooks) will probably win out.

Nevertheless, I think that if Apple wants to portray itself as a paragon of privacy virtue, it had better clean up its act in the Apple Store first.